Archive for July, 2013

Some Common Medical Abbreviations

 

Some Common Medical Abbreviations

copied and pasted from NIH (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/appendixb.html )

Abbreviation

Stands for

More information

ABG Arterial blood gases You may have an ABG test to detect lung diseases.
ACE Angiotensin converting enzyme Drugs called ACE inhibitors are used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, diabetes and kidney diseases.
ACL Anterior cruciate ligament Commonly injured part of the knee
ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder A behavior disorder
AFIB Atrial fibrillation A disturbance of the rhythm of the heart
AIDS Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Infection caused by human immunodeficiency virus
ALP Alkaline phosphatase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver or bone disease.
ALS Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease
ALT Alanine aminotransferase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver disease.
AMD Age-related macular degeneration An eye problem
AMI Acute myocardial infarction Heart attack
AODM Adult onset diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes
AST Aspartate aminotransferase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver disease.
AVM Arteriovenous malformation A defect in the circulatory system.
BID Twice a day Your doctor may write this on your prescription.
BMI Body mass index A measure of how much you should weigh based on your height
BP Blood pressure The force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries
BPH Benign prostatic hypertrophy Enlargement of the prostate gland
BRCA Breast Cancer Gene People with the gene may be at increased risk for breast or ovarian cancer.
BUN Blood urea nitrogen You may have a blood test for BUN to detect kidney disease problems.
CA Cancer OR Calcium
CA-125 Cancer antigen 125 You may have a blood test for CA-125 A to measure cancer activity.
CABG Coronary artery bypass graft A type of heart surgery
CAD Coronary artery disease A common type of heart disease
CAT Computerized axial tomography A type of x-ray
CBC Complete blood count A blood test that measures many properties of the cells in your blood
CHD Congenital heart disease Heart disease you were born with
CHF Congestive heart failure Also called heart failure. A condition in which the heart can’t pump enough blood throughout the body.
CMV Cytomegalovirus A common virus
CNS Central nervous system The brain and spinal cord
COPD Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease A lung disease that makes it hard to breathe
CPK Creatine phosphokinase You may have a blood test for CPK to see if you’ve had a heart attack.
CPR Cardiopulmonary resuscitation An emergency procedure whose heart has stopper or is no longer breathing
CRF Chronic renal failure Failure of the kidneys
CRP C-reactive protein You may have a blood test for CRP to see if you have   inflammation or heart problems.
CSF Cerebrospinal fluid A fluid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord
CVA Cerebrovascular accident A stroke or “brain attack”
CXR Chest x-ray A diagnostic test that uses radiation to make images of your lungs
D&C Dilatation and curettage A surgical procedure on the uterus (womb)
DJD Degenerative joint disease Another name for arthritis
DM Diabetes mellitus
DTP Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis A vaccine for three diseases
DVT Deep-vein thrombosis A blood clot
DX Diagnosis
ECG, EKG Electrocardiogram A test that measures electrical impulses of the heart
ECHO Echocardiogram A test that uses sound waves to look at the heart
EEG Electroencephalogram A test that measures electrical impulses of the brain
EMG Electromyography A test that measures electrical impulses of muscles
ENT Ear, nose and throat
ERCP Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography A way to diagnose problems in the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts and pancreas
ESR Erythrocyte sedimentation rate A blood test for inflammation
ESRD End-stage renal (kidney) disease
FSH Follicle stimulating hormone If you are a woman, you may have a blood test for FSH to evaluate fertility.
GERD Gastroesophageal reflux disease A problem that happens when stomach contents leak back into your gullet
GI Gastrointestinal Another term for your digestive system
GFR Glomerular filtration rate A test of kidney damage
GU Genitourinary The urinary and sex organs
HAV Hepatitis A virus A virus that causes one type of liver disease
HBV Hepatitis B virus A virus that causes one type of liver disease
HCT Hematocrit A blood test measurement
HCV Hepatitis C virus A virus that causes one type of liver disease
HDL High density lipoprotein A type of cholesterol, also known as “good” cholesterol
HGB Hemoglobin A blood test measurement
HIV Human immunodeficiency virus The virus that causes AIDS
HPV Human papilloma virus A virus that causes cervical cancer
HRT Hormone replacement therapy Hormones supplements that women may take
HTN Hypertension High blood pressure
IBD Inflammatory bowel disease A name for two digestive disorders– ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease
IBS Irritable bowel syndrome A problem with the large intestine
ICD Implantable cardioverter defibrillator A device that monitors heart rhythm problems
ICU Intensive care unit Special hospital unit
IDDM Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus Type 1 diabetes
IM Intramuscular A type of injection
IUD Intrauterine device A type of birth control for women
IV Intravenous A type of injection
IVP Intravenous pyelogram An x-ray test of the  urinary system
LDL Low density lipoprotein A type of cholesterol, also known as “bad” cholesterol
LFT Liver function tests
MI Myocardial infarction Heart attack
MMR Measles, mumps, and rubella A vaccine for three diseases
MRI Magnetic resonance imaging A  type of imaging test
MRSA Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus A type of infection
MS Multiple sclerosis A disease of the nervous system
NG Nasogastric You may need an NG tube to empty the contents of your stomach.
NIDDM Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes
NKDA No known drug allergies
NSAID Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug Drugs like ibuprofen
OCD Obsessive-compulsive disorder A type of anxiety disorder
PAD Peripheral arterial disease Diseases of the arteries outside the heart
PAP Papanicolau You may need a PAP test to detect cervical cancer.
PAT Paroxysmal atrial tachycardia A disturbance of the rhythm of the heart
PET Positron emission tomography A type of x-ray test
PFT Pulmonary function test You may need PFTs to find out how your lungs are working.
PID Pelvic inflammatory disease Infection and inflammation of the female reproductive organs
PMS Premenstrual syndrome A group of symptoms that may happen before a woman’s period
PPD Purified protein derivative You may have a PPD skin test for tuberculosis.
PRN As needed Your doctor may write this on your prescription.
PSA Prostate specific antigen You may have a blood test for PSA to detect prostate disease.
PT Prothrombin time A measure of blood clotting
PTH Parathyroid hormone You may have a blood test for PTH to detect    parathyroid disease.
PTSD Post-traumatic stress syndrome An illness caused by traumatic events
PTT Partial thromboplastin time A measure of blood clotting
PUD Peptic ulcer disease A disease of the stomach
PVC Premature ventricular contraction A disturbance of the rhythm of the heart
QID Four times a day Your doctor may write this on your prescription.
RA Rheumatoid arthritis A type of joint disease
RBC Red blood cell A type of blood cell
RSV Respiratory syncytial virus A virus that causes infections in children
Rx Treatment
SAD Seasonal affective disorder Depression during seasons with little light
SIDS Sudden infant death syndrome
SLE Systemic lupus erythematosus Lupus for short
SOB Shortness of Breath
STD Sexually transmitted disease
T3 Triiodothyronine You may have a blood test for T3 to detect thyroid disease.
T4 Thyroxine You may have a blood test for T4 to detect thyroid disease.
TB Tuberculosis An infection of the lungs
TAH Total abdominal hysterectomy Surgery to remove a woman’s uterus (womb)
TIA Transient ischemic attack A  small stroke
TIBC Total iron binding capacity A test that measures the amount of iron in your blood
TID Three times a day Your doctor may write this on your prescription.
TMJ Temporomandibular joint The joint that connects your jaw to the side of your head
TORCH Stands for a group of infections that may cause birth defects  A newborn will have this test to check for infections. Sometimes the mother also needs the test.
TSH Thyroid stimulating hormone You may have a blood test for TSH to detect thyroid disease.
TURP Transurethral resection of prostate gland An operation to remove parts of the prostate gland
URI Upper respiratory infection Another name for the common cold
UTI Urinary tract infection Infection of the bladder and kidneys
XRT Radiotherapy Therapy that uses radiation, usually for cancer
WBC White blood cell A type of blood cell

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/appendixb.html

And a tutorial on some medical words

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/medicalwords/

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Let’s get everyone with ME on the map

Toby Vokal created the following map for people with ME/CFS to pin their location. http://pininthemap.com/MEGlobal
(Step One): Click “add extra pin to this map” in green lettering on bottom of page.

(Step Two) Use controls on left side of screen to find location. Left click once on location to pin.

(Step Three): A box will appear. Add info such as city, state, and country.

(Step Four): Enter password tv621977. Hit save.

(Step Five): All that is needed is your city, state, & country but feel free to add additional pertinent info.

Toby has made a video to help guide you through the process. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4fT5t9kXIY&feature=youtu.be

 

Let’s get everyone with ME on the map. (Please put your info only on the map.)

Share this widely please.

There’s still time to submit comments to FDA docket on Drug Development for ME and CFS

Did you know, as of July 17th 2013, only 193 comments have been submitted to the FDA docket on Drug Development for ME and CFS?

Comments (from any country) can still be submitted (http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FDA-2012-N-0962-0004 ) until August 2, 2013.

Remember you can attach a document if your comments are more than 2000 characters long and/or you can provide your comment via video with a YouTube link.

FDA suggested two topics for comment. Consider including medicines you have tried – even if off-label – and their effects (positive, negative, no effect,side effects, intolerable side effects, etc.).

 

FDA Suggested Topic 1: Disease Symptoms and Daily Impacts That Matter Most to Patients

1. What are the most significant symptoms that you experience resulting from your condition? (Examples may include prolonged exhaustion, confusion, muscle pain, heat or cold intolerance.)

2. What are the most negative impacts on your daily life that result from your condition and its symptoms? (Examples may include difficulty with specific activities, such as sleeping through the night.)

a. How does the condition affect your daily life on the best days and worst days?

b. What changes have you had to make in your life because of your condition?

FDA Suggested Topic 2: Patients’ Perspectives on Current Approaches To Treating CFS and ME

1. What treatments are you currently using to help treat your condition or its symptoms? (Examples may include FDA-approved medicines, over-the-counter products, and other therapies, including non-drug therapies such as activity limitations.)

a. What specific symptoms do your treatments address?

b. How has your treatment regimen changed over time and why?

2. How well does your current treatment regimen treat the most significant symptoms of your disease?

a. Have these treatments improved your daily life (for example, improving your ability to do specific activities)? Please explain.

b. How well have these treatments worked for you as your condition has changed over time?

c. What are the most significant downsides of these treatments (for example, specific side effects)?

Transcript Day I April 25, 2013 http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/NewsEvents/UCM354951.pdf

Transcript Day II April 26, 2013 http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/NewsEvents/UCM355406.pdf

 

Cooling products (July 2013)

Cooling products (July 2013)

Some people with OI (orthostatic intolerance), POTS (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome), etc. feel “better” in warm weather and “feel” better in cold weather.

Increased humidity, poor air quality and heat have very negative effects on the two patients I know best.

A friend helped us start this list of cooling vests and other cooling products:

http://www.bodycooling.net/cooling.html

http://www.mscooling.com/product/6522

http://www.mscooling.com/phasechangevest

http://www.stacoolvest.com/

http://www.glaciertek.com/

http://www.arcticheatusa.com/

http://www.techniche-intl.com/en/home.html

http://www.coolsport.net/index2.html

http://store.polarsoftice.com/polarshop/pc/home.asp

It was nice to find out that the cooling vests and neck wraps do indeed make a difference for our household (even indoors).

Consider the humidity levels of your area.

If high humidity is frequent in your area, products that use freezer/gel packs (while more expensive) cool much more effectively than evaporative products.

 

Sue J supplied a link to a blanket (thanks):

http://www.solutions.com/jump.jsp?itemID=17114&itemType=PRODUCT&iProductID=17114

 

Pillows and such:

http://www.solutions.com/jump.jsp?itemType=PRODUCT&itemID=17022

http://www.polarproducts.com/polarshop/pc/Soft-Ice-Cooling-Pillowcase-14p42.htm

http://www.amazon.com/Hot-Flash-Cooling-Pillow-Primley/dp/B001PL7R5Y

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0029LHHP4/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=1535523722&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001PL7R5Y&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1MMFH80N3QQ3EP14AWC0

http://www.amazon.com/Sleep-Innovations-Reversible-Memory-Pillow/dp/B0073CIVTK/ref=pd_sim_hg_4

http://solutions.blair.com/p/cool-gelmat/51165.uts

 

Absorber cloths cut into long strips that you just dunk into cold water.  They don’t get as warm as the fatter neck cloths and they’re not heavy.  (thanks SHW)

http://www.amazon.com/Frogg-Toggs-Chilly-Cooling-Towel/dp/B0049RPBWW Because this is an evaporative product, it will be more effective in areas of low humidity.

 

Other cooling products:

http://www.polarproducts.com/polarshop/pc/Kool-Max-Ankle-Foot-Cooling-Wrap-14p232.htm

http://www.polarproducts.com/polarshop/pc/Pair-of-Kool-Max-Cooling-Wrist-Wraps-14p82.htm

http://www.polarproducts.com/polarshop/pc/Kool-Max-Cooling-Neck-Upper-Spine-Wrap-14p43.htm

http://www.mscooling.com/phase-changing

http://www.amazon.com/BeColm-Hot-Flash-Relief-Cooling/dp/B007V81OGS/ref=pd_sim_hg_24

Amazon has many additional cooling products – possible search terms are: cooling for MS, cooling vest, cooling neck wraps, cooling wraps wrist (or ankle).

Please consider the humidity levels of your area.

If high humidity is frequent in your area, products that use freezer/gel packs (while more expensive) cool much more effectively than evaporative products.