Posts Tagged 'health'

Dear HealthCare Professional

We have seen all sorts of comments by healthcare professionals about patients with ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) and what is “really” wrong with them.

These are just a few comments (and what is implied by those comments).

They just don’t want to work (they want to be on disability, they stand to gain from disability),

are bored (so they spend their time imagining symptoms),

can’t cope with everyday stress (they need psychological help),

don’t exercise (and are deconditioned),

are fat (and deconditioned),

don’t want to be responsible for themselves (they want to go on disability and live an easy life),

want stimulants, narcotics, etc (they are drugseekers),

want disabled parking tags (because disability is a perk).

 

Dear Healthcare Professionals,

Comments about patients with ME (myalgic encephalomyelitis) such as those made by healthcare professionals like you are painful. I hope this post helps you understand some of our pain and frustration.

My two young adult sons have ME which is a complex and challenging disease.

Both of my sons meet the IOM criteria (this link is to The Clinician’s Guide and you can access the full report ). They also meet the CCC criteria for ME.

One son suddenly became sick since he was 12 years old. He is in his early 20s now.

My other son gradually sick about 15 months later. He too is in his 20s.

Neither of my sons are/were lazy.

A few specifics about my sons.

One son taught himself to multiply before he went to kindergarten.

The other was reading middle school level books at age 5.

They were lively, curious, and fully engaged with life, family and friends.

At the time they got sick they were competitive swimmers, swimming upwards of 20 miles a week.

The sudden onset of one son’s illness rendered him housebound, unable to do schoolwork, inexplicably unable to do mental math that had been effortless for him at age 5, unable to socialize, unable to leave home for things other than medically related appointments. In other words – no fun.

My other son had a gradual onset and he too is housebound and partially bedbound, unable to retain what he reads, unable to socialize, unable to leave home for anything other than medically related appointments. In other words – no fun.

In the past 10+ years since they got sick my sons have diligently done everything suggested by healthcare professionals (including various specialists) – to little avail. Most medications we have tried have produced no benefit and few produce enough benefit to endure their adverse effects.

My sons have not been able to learn to drive – frequent, unexpected syncopal episodes, impaired decision-making, and slowed reaction times would make their safety and that of those around them a significant concern.

My sons’ limited capacity for (cognitive or physical) exertion is not a result of deconditioning.

For one son, the exertion intolerance (a hallmark of this disease) began quite abruptly with the sudden onset of his illness.

For my other son, the exertion intolerance and the disease revealed themselves more gradually.

And as I mentioned above, when they became ill, they were swimming at least 20 miles a week so they were in great physical shape. Therefore deconditioning is in no way an explanation of their exertion intolerance.

These days cognitive and or physical exertion in excess of the strict limits imposed by this horrible disease, produce a dramatic exacerbation of symptoms (post-exertional malaise or PEM) that can last for weeks and render my sons even more disabled than their baseline (which on a good day is about 30% of normal).

All too often I see comments by healthcare professionals saying these patients want stimulants, narcotics, Xanax, disability and disabled parking tags.

My sons take no stimulants (bad reactions to them), no narcotics, no Xanax, etc.

Neither of my sons want to use the disabled parking tag that we have – they don’t want to feel labeled by doing so. So we use the tag quite sparingly – but then again my sons are out of the house so rarely that any use is sparingly.

My sons don’t get SSDI (Social Security Disability) – they have never been able to work so therefore never accrued work credits to qualify for SSDI and having never worked, they never had the option of long-term disability insurance.

Since my sons’ illness onset and because they are so severely impaired by this disease, I have been their 24/7 unpaid caregiver.

There is NOTHING to gain for us with this disease and we do our best not to think about the significant losses (independence, educational aspirations, making a difference in the world, spontaneity, vacations, and on and on).

So you see, your comments about us are not accurate. Nor are they appropriate. And inaccurate, inappropriate, disparaging, and or demeaning comments such as yours cause significant pain and detract from your job which is to help patients.

We don’t need or deserve additional pain and or hardship in our lives.

In public and in private, we deserve respect, compassion, appropriate diagnoses and appropriate treatment. NOW!

Sincerely,

A parent of two patients with ME

May 12th is ME Awareness Day

Advertisements

#Millions Missing

Millions of people are missing from everyday life because of Millions Missing from research and Millions Missing of appropriately educated healthcare professionals to care for patients

The #Millions Missing demonstration will take place on 25 May 2016 in select locations across the globe.

#MillionsMissing ME/CFS Protest Demands

  1. Increased Funding and Program Investments

Funding and program investments commensurate with the disease burden

  1. Clinical Trials

Clinical trials to secure medical treatments for ME/CFS

  1. Accurate Medical Education

Replacement of misinformation with accurate medical education and clinical guidelines

  1. A Serious Commitment

HHS leadership, oversight and a serious commitment to urgently address ME/CFS

#MEAction has posted the rationale for the demands.

NOTE –

There is an open community meeting hosted by MEAction on

Wed. May 11th, 2-3:30 pm EDT

to discuss the demands and

hear any questions or concerns you have about them.

More info and call sign-up here:

 https://my.meaction.net/events/millionsmissing-national-call

MEAction says “We are thinking of these demands as a living document. We plan that after the protests (May 25) it will evolve as we get input from the community. MEAction.net will set up a mechanism for receiving that community input. This task, and the evolution of the demands document, will happen after the protests, simply because we lack the capacity to do it while we are organizing the protests.”

MillionsMissing graphic 1

 

 

 

 

 

Bits and pieces

Many thanks to all those who have written to Tell Dr. Collins to Stop P2P

If you have not already done so, fax or email Dr. Francis Collins today and request that he cancel the P2P Workshop.

Details here http://www.occupycfs.com/2014/06/02/tell-dr-collins-to-stop-p2p/

Additional information about P2P:

http://www.occupycfs.com/?s=P2P

A parallel action to contact Congressional officials about P2P will be released shortly.

WEGO Health Twitter chat about advocating for oneself while living with a stigmatized chronic disease. Hosted by Jennie Spotila

Date: Tuesday, June 10th

Time 3-4pm (Eastern time).

Details http://www.occupycfs.com/2014/06/08/twitter-chat/

The next meeting of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee (CFSAC)

Monday afternoon (12-5pm Eastern time) June 16th and Tuesday June17th (9am-5pm Eastern time).

The meeting will be live-video streamed at http://www.hhs.gov/live . (Registration to attend in person ends June 12th. Details https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/05/29/2014-12371/meeting-of-the-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-advisory-committee )

Of special interest to those with OI (POTS, NMH, etc)

Dr. Peter Rowe has kindly given permission for his brochure on orthostatic intolerance and its treatment thereof to be posted here: OIinfo2013.

This information should not take the place of your regular medical professional. It could however be beneficial for you and your practitioner to read and discuss to see if treatment modalities described here might be of benefit to you.

(Please note that this is the November 2013 version which is the most current as of 1 April 2014.)

You may also want to check out the easy to print cards on this site to carry with you:

http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/page.php?ID=164

This one is about OI:

http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/images/MedicalAccommodationCard_OI.jpg

This one is about POTS:

http://www.dysautonomiainternational.org/images/MedicalAccommodationCard.jpg

READING THIS Exit Stage Right

(http://www.occupycfs.com/2014/03/13/exit-stage-right/) MAKES Ms. LOPEZ-MAJANO’s PUBLIC COMMENT on 11 March 2014 seem even more significant:

“Even before arriving at their first meeting, CFSAC members need to be well versed in the history, politics, science, breadth of illness, and issues of concern to the community, as well as what has transpired since the committee’s current inception in 2003.

They also need to be ready to work. Right away!

During the December 2013 meeting Dr. Kaplan said “The Center of Excellence idea I think is extremely important and one that I think we should be recommending…”

It is disconcerting that Dr. Kaplan seemed quite unaware that Centers of Excellence have been mentioned more than 130 times in 10 years of CFSAC meetings. It seems to me that he is not familiar with the past work of the CFSAC.

If committee members haven’t made the effort to find out what CFSAC has discussed, then I wonder if you are sufficiently involved with and knowledgeable about this illness and the issues surrounding it.

Committee members also need to be actively involved in the committee’s work. This includes during meetings, in working groups etc.

I understand that not everyone will have input on every point of discussion. However, when committee members are not active participants, it seems those members are chair-warmers – or worse yet, just there to pad their resumes.

Most of you don’t have this illness. WE however are seriously impacted by it at all times and very few advocates are healthy enough to work on all that needs to be done to improve our situation. So we need an effective CFSAC to help us.

Since this committee is charged with making recommendations to and advising the Secretary of Health and Human Services, you need to do everything you can to ensure that this committee works efficiently and expeditiously.

Additionally, despite assurances from HHS that CFSAC terms would be staggered, five six [updated 13 March 2014 to include resignation of Jordan Dimitrakoff] committee vacancies will occur between May and July (2014). Any committee comprised of only 11 voting members, will be unable to work expeditiously if new members need time to learn about the committee, the illness, etc.

I urge the Secretary to ensure that every voting member of the CFSAC is well aware of the committee’s work, of issues regarding this illness and of the issues of importance to this community.

I also urge the Secretary to require that the DFO provide appropriate orientation to committee members.

These actions will help ensure that the committee can always work at full-speed to help those affected by this illness that plagues my grandchildren and so many other people.”

 

 

Videos to watch, post to read….

We urge you to:

(1) watch these videos by Dr. Nigel Speight about ME in children

http://youtu.be/XcRZo1vO53c

http://youtu.be/XcRZo1vO53c

 

AND

(2) read this great post by Dr. Leonard Jason: http://blog.oup.com/2014/01/diseases-can-stigmatize-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

“Diseases can stigmatize

By Leonard A. Jason

Names of diseases have never required scientific accuracy (e.g. malaria means bad air, lyme is a town, and ebola is a river). But some disease names are offensive, victim-blaming, and stigmatizing. Multiple sclerosis was once called hysterical paralysis when people believed that this disease was caused by stress linked with oedipal fixations. AIDS was initially called “Gay Men’s disease” when it was considered a disease only affecting white gay men. Fortunately, when these disease names were changed, those afflicted with Multiple Sclerosis and AIDS experienced less stigma. Inspired patient activists from around the world are currently engaged in another major effort to rename chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). It is a political struggle to alleviate some of the stigma caused by the language of scientists at the CDC 25 years ago. ….”        (http://blog.oup.com/2014/01/diseases-can-stigmatize-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/)

If you want to submit written public comment for the open session of January 27th, 2014 IOM meeting on Diagnostic Criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

IOM has said:  It would be most useful if comments are focused on the following question: “What is the most important aspect or information that this committee should consider throughout the course of the study?”

Anyone can submit written comment to the meeting. (No limit on length.) What are you going to tell them?

If you submit by Jan 22nd the committee will get a copy of them before the meeting on Jan 27. Use this email address – mecfsopensession@nas.edu. Comments submitted after Jan 22 will still go to the committee, but possibly not until after the meeting.

All comments go into the public access file.

Additional info: http://iom.edu/Activities/Disease/DiagnosisMyalgicEncephalomyelitisChronicFatigueSyndrome/2014-JAN-27.aspx

After January 27, send written comments to the project email address (mecfs@nas.edu).

Reminder -the Statement of Work for this project – obtained by Ms Spotila – can be seen here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/57025850/MECFS%20IOM%20SOW.pdf .

The tentative agenda for the January 27th, 2014 open session of the meeting on Diagnostic Criteria for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.